Carpenter Farm Park Volunteers Early July

Spotted knapweed in the Meadow
Spotted knapweed in the Meadow

July 3, 2015: Various methods exist for eliminating invasive weeds from a field of tall grass. Volunteer Susan Guarlnick cut, removed and solarized  invasive brown knapweed in the lower meadow using pruners.

 

Selective Cutting/Solarizing Spotted Knapweed Seed Heads
Selective Cutting/Solarizing Spotted Knapweed Seed Heads

The following day I cut and removed large clumps of brown knapweed flowers and seed heads using a sickle. Faster than with a pruner, I was still able to selectively leave wildflowers like black- eyed-susan and goldenrod untouched.

 

Large multiflora rose
Large Multiflora Rose Obscures Trail

 

After mastering the art of cutting and uprooting a smaller multiflora rose, Michelle Mitard and her two sons Russel and Kyle eliminated a large shrub that hid the newly blazed trail.

 

With Multiflora Rose Gone the Trail is Visible
With Multiflora Rose Gone the Trail is Visible

                                        Once the shrub was removed the trail came into view.

Russel and Kyle are boy scouts who will receive service points for their volunteer work.

Autumn Olive Shrubs
Autumn Olive Shrubs

 

 

 

July 4, 2015: A line of small autumn olive shrubs marked the outer edge of the former horse paddock. Although attractive, these shrubs are not native and are spreading by birds throughout Long Island.

Extrracting Autum Olive Shrubs
Extracting Autumn Olive Shrubs
Tree Obscured by, Multiflora Rose, Oriental Bittersweet, Porcelain Berry
Tree Obscured by, Multiflora Rose, Oriental Bittersweet, Porcelain Berry

 

Debbie Hanley and Jim Bentson cut eight small autumn olive shrubs, uprooting them with a large weed wrench. Later,  lateral roots were extracted to prevent regrowth from any remaining segments.

 

July 8, 2015: Approaching the lower fence, I discovered a tree hidden behind multiflora rose, oriental bittersweet and porcelain berry. Wearing thick leather work gloves, I spent an hour or two cutting down the shrub and vines with long loppers.

Black Walnut Sapling
Black Walnut Sapling

Once freed from the tangle of invasive plants the tree turned out being native black walnut. These trees have the reputation of producing chemicals  that inhibit plants from growing beneath its canopy. However, it appears non-native invasives are far from being sensitive.

The Gate at the Fence Line
The Gate at the Fence Line

The old fence with its narrow gate was an obstacle for the crew and machines that mowed the trail through the meadow. It turned out to be a double fence line where invasives had established a tangled foothold within the ten feet of space separating them.

The Wrecking Crew
The Wrecking Crew

Thanks to the powerful efforts of Karin Ralph, a twenty year landscaping professional, and farmer Jim, we cut and removed multiflora rose, oriental bittersweet, porcelain berry and a new arrival, creeping euonymus, from between the two fences, widening the meadow’s entrance.